Scientists find giant black-hole merging in a nearby galaxy

Scientists find giant

A black hole is a region of general relativity where gravity is so strong that no particle or even light such as electromagnetic radiation can escape it. Objects can fall into a black hole, but cannot come out. Indian scientists, in a recent study, have detected supermassive black-holes merging in a nearby galaxy.
According to scientists, the supermassive black hole is the largest type of black hole. It is estimated that most – or possibly all – galaxies have a supermassive black-hole at their centres. In this study, researchers have detected three merging supermassive black-holes in our nearby galaxy, which together form a triple active galactic nucleus.

 

A black hole is a region of general relativity where gravity is so strong that no particle or even light such as electromagnetic radiation can escape it. Objects can fall into a black hole, but cannot come out. Indian scientists, in a recent study, have detected supermassive black-holes merging in a nearby galaxy.
According to scientists, the supermassive black hole is the largest type of black hole. It is estimated that most – or possibly all – galaxies have a supermassive black-hole at their centres. In this study, researchers have detected three merging supermassive black-holes in our nearby galaxy, which together form a triple active galactic nucleus.

Scientists say about this new discovery that this is a solid region in the center of our nearby galaxy, which has a much brighter than normal. This rare occurrence in our nearby galaxies suggests that merging small clusters are ideal laboratories for the detection of the majority of supermassive black holes and increases the chances of detecting such rare events. This information has been given in a statement issued by the Ministry of Science and Technology.

Because of not emitting any kind of light, supermassive black-holes are difficult to detect. However, they can manifest their presence by being integrated with their surroundings. When dust and gas from the surroundings fall on such a massive black-hole, some of its mass is swallowed up by the black-hole. But, some of this mass is converted into energy and emitted as electromagnetic radiation, making the black-hole appear very bright. These are called Active Galactic Nucleus-AGNs. Such nuclei release huge amounts of ionized particles and energy into the galaxy and its atmosphere. These two then contribute to the development of the medium around the Milky Way and ultimately to the growth of the Milky Way and its increase in size.

Researchers from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (Indian Institute of Astrophysics) and France have jointly studied galaxies named NGC-7733 and NGC-7734. Researchers have detected unusual emission from the center of NGC-7734, a known interacting galaxy, and a large bright clump along the northern arm of NGC-7733. Their investigation revealed that this galaxy is moving at a different speed than NGC-7733. Scientists also meant here that this clump-like mass was not a part of NGC-7733, but a small, but separate galaxy behind the northern arm. He named this galaxy NGC-7733N.

Scientists at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics say that if two galaxies collide, their black holes will also come closer by transferring their kinetic energy to the surrounding gas. The distance between black holes decreases over time until the distance between them is around one parsec (3.26 light-years). After this the two black-holes are no longer able to expend much of their kinetic energy so that they can come closer and merge into each other. This is known as the last parsec problem. Scientists believe that the presence of a third black-hole can solve this problem. The two merging black-holes can then transfer their energy to the third black-hole and then merge with each other.

The study found the first Indian space observatory’s Astrosat Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT), the European Integral Field Optical Telescope, also known as MUSE, and the Very Large Telescope (VLT) installed in Chile. Infrared images obtained from the Optical Telescope in South Africa (IRSF) have been used with the data.

Ultra-violet-UV and H-alpha images also supported the presence of a third galaxy there by revealing the formation of a new star with the tidal tails of the emanating wave, which is a larger galaxy with NGC-7733. It could have been formed by the merger of N. An active supermassive black-hole remains at the center (nucleus) of both these galaxies. Therefore, these make a very rare AGN system.

According to the researchers, a major factor influencing galaxy evolution is the interaction of galaxies. Different galaxies come close to each other and exert their tremendous gravitational force on each other. In this way, when galaxies meet with each other, the chances of the supermassive black-holes present in them also increasing near each other. In such a situation, the diploid black-holes begin to consume gas from their surroundings and transform into a dual active galactic nucleus system (AGN).

The study has been published in the research journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. In this study, researchers Jyoti Yadav, Moushumi Das and Sudhanshu Barve from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, besides François Combes from the Paris Observatory in France are involved. -(India Science Wire)

 

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